Services

LED streetlight upgrade

Over the next eight to nine months the Council will be replacing approximately 2,000 of the district’s 4,786 sodium vapour street lamps with new white light-emitting diode (LED) lights.

The conversion is being made possible as a result of a one-off Government subsidy. The NZ Transport Agency will contribute 85 per cent of the estimated $1 million cost to convert to LED lights.

LED lights offer significant benefits. They provide better illumination and draw more than 50 per cent less power than sodium vapour street lamps. They also have a much longer shelf life, around 20 years compared to four to five years for a sodium vapour street lamp, which means they don’t need to be replaced as often and the cost to run and maintain street lighting is reduced.

LED lights have already been installed in parts of Kāpiti and the Council plans to use the subsidy to complete the balance of Paekākāriki, Ōtaki and Waikanae.

Subject to funding, the Council aims to replace the remaining yellow sodium vapour street lamps in the district with LED lights over the next three years.

 

Frequently asked questions

Why is the Council making the conversion to LED lights?

LED lights provide better illumination and draw more than 50 per cent less power than sodium vapour street lamps. They also have a much longer shelf life, around 20 years compared to four to five years for a sodium vapour street lamp, which means they don’t need to be replaced as often and the cost to run and maintain street lighting is reduced.

Will people notice a difference?

Yes, LED lights omit a white light which can appear much brighter than the dull orange light you get from traditional street lamps. The light spill will be directed downwards to the road and footpath which will reduce light pollution.

Will the LED lights be brighter?

LED lights omit a white light which can appear much brighter than the dull orange light you get from traditional street lamps. The intention is to try and replace like with like and for the level of light intensity to be the same. Contractors will carry out light intensity testing before and after installation to ensure the light intensity is within acceptable levels and complies with the NZ Standard for road lighting. The light spill will be directed downwards to the road and footpath which will reduce light pollution.

Are you replacing the poles as well?

No, we are only replacing the head (luminaire) of the street lamp. The light fixtures we use are from the NZ Transport Agency approved list and some will be fitted with clear or blacked out, dome-shaped covers to control the light spill into people’s property.

When will the installation take place?

Starting in Ōtaki we’ll be replacing sodium vapour street lamps with LED lights over the next eight to nine months.

Converting the lights in Otaki is expected to take approximately three months. Our contractors will start down at Ōtaki Beach from Monday 9 October and will work their way towards the Ōtaki township before moving to Waikanae and Paekākāriki.

There will be some disruption while our contractors work to convert the light fittings but we aim to keep this to a minimum. Contractors will use a bucket truck and may need to cordon off sections of footpath to enable them to carry out the job safely.

Are there any adverse effects from LED lighting?

As with any street lighting, light pollution can be an issue if appropriate steps are not taken to mitigate possible adverse effects. The light fixtures we use are from the NZ Transport Agency approved list and meet their standard for colour corrected temperature and intensity.

There are things we can do to mitigate light pollution. For example a clear or blacked out, dome-shaped cover can be fitted to control the light spill into people’s property. The light fixtures will also be equipped with a socket that will allow controller to be fitted to dim the lights remotely, for example late at night when activity on the roads is lower, at a later date subject to funding.

Our contractors will carry out light intensity testing before and after installation to ensure the light intensity is within acceptable levels and complies with the NZ Standard for road lighting.

How much is this conversion costing the Council?

The conversion to LED street lights is being made possible as a result of a one-off Government subsidy. The NZ Transport Agency will contribute 85 per cent of the estimated $1 million cost to convert to LED lights.

Why aren’t you taking the opportunity to replace all of the street lights in the district now?

The conversion is being made possible as a result of a one-off Government subsidy. Subject to funding, the Council aims to replace the remaining yellow sodium vapour street lamps in the district with LED lights over the next three years.

 LED Lights