Our District

Eco Home Advice

Will your home be warm and comfortable over winter? Was your home cool and comfortable over summer?

Our homes are our sanctuary in our busy lives and it’s very important they are comfortable over the whole year. Various studies and reports all reach the same conclusion, your home environment reflects on your and your family’s health.

Richard Morrison, council's Eco Design Advisor, offers free sustainable home advice to help make your home healthier and more comfortable. His free home visits and presentations are available to homeowners, tenants and those considering building or renovating.  Richard can come to your home and spend up to two hours with you, looking at your needs and making recommendations so that you can maximise the potential of your home. You don't need to be a homeowner, Richards recommendations are a mixture of no cost, low cost and other solutions specific to your situation and needs. If you are  building a new home, Richard can help you avoid some common mistakes.

"…. Richard provided excellent information and advice across a wide range of topics and areas all tailored to our property” Sarah H.

Arrange a free consultation now and take the first step and be on the way to a warmer drier and healthier home.  Call Richard on ph 04 296 4651

 

A funding offer to insulate your home.

Grants of 50% of the cost of insulation are now available for low-income home owners and landlords with low-income tenants. You may qualify for a grant if:

  • the house was built before the year 2000, and
  • you own the home and have a Community Services Card, or
  • your named tenant has a Community Services Card.

Find out more.

Crying windows, a crying shame. 

It’s a sad fact that many New Zealand homes are cold and damp. During the winter months, condensation on glazing, aluminium window frames and cold walls and ceiling surfaces is common. By using an absorbent cloth, a scoopy (see picture) or a window vacuum you can remove the moisture on your windows. Read more.

The Curtain Bank is back!

After last year’s success the Curtain Bank is coming back to the Ōtaki Citizens Advice Bureau. From April 24-May 5 Community Services Card holders can order free fully-lined curtains are available for main living areas and the bedrooms of children and elderly. Read more.

 

 

 

Breathe easy by reducing mould in your home.

Over 45% of our homes have visible mould, which can have a huge impact on our health contributing to asthma and respiratory illness problems. However there are simple, economic ways to combat mould and breathe easy. Its all about reducing the amount of moisture in your home. Read more

Top Tips for reducing your electricity bills.

Simple ways to save hundreds of dollars. Read more.

Dry homes are cheaper to heat.

If I tipped half a bucket of water on to your carpet what would you say to me? No doubt some choice words would come to mind! But did you know that the same amount of moisture (over 5 litres), comes off a load of washing drying inside. Read more.

Maximise comfort and health, by upgrading your insulation 
 
A chill is in the air. If you are indoors and feeling some drafts it’s time to look at some ways to make your home warmer for winter. As Richard Morrison explains, it’s all about insulation and curtains. Read more.

 

It’s time to get cosy for winter

Warm curtains are now FREE to community service card holders. The curtains, lined and made to fit, are available through the Curtain Bank which The Sustainability Trust, with support from the Council and Energise Ōtaki, is bringing to Ōtaki. Read more.

 

 

Careful bulb selection means big savings.

While you can buy a standard incandescent bulbs for between 50 cents to $1-00 each, an LED bulb which cost between $14 - $18 is much better value. Find out why.

 

A hot tip for keeping your home cool

Nelson Lebo, Eco Design Advisor from Palmerston North hit the news with a cooling system for hot nights. Turn the fan around, point it out the window to blow the hot air out and open a window on the shady side of the house to draw the cool air in. Read more.